The Snail Trail

Travelling with my home on my back and in no hurry to get anywhere

Broken Hill and Beyond

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It’s been a long time between blogs! Since leaving Kulin in Western Australia I have crossed the Nullarbor, visited Broken Hill and caught up with family members I had never met before, travelled from there down to Mildura and then along the mighty Murray River – and throughout most of that trip have endured temperatures in the mid -30deg to low 40deg! And I’ve certainly travelled a few kms in a few weeks!

Kulin to West Wyalong

 

One of the most IMG_6263exciting times of this journey was meeting my nephew Anthony, his wife Lealyn and their two beautiful daughters, Elle and Holle, which is one of the main reasons I went to Broken Hill. I was so lucky I was able to sleep in their air conditioned home as the temperatures were over 40deg C every day I was there (and I must say, it hasn’t been much cooler since!) I can’t believe I didn’t take any photos but can share this one with you of a love-in with their much loved pugs, Pixie and Peaches. I’m so grateful I had the opportunity to have some time getting to know Anthony and his family.

It’s sad when generations of families lose contact due to some circumstance that today’s descendants know nothing about….

 

You can’t go to Broken Hill without going to Silverton, which is about 25kms north. BMM (Before Mad Max), Silverton was famous for its mining, as the town where the trade union movement originated in 1884 and where BHP was formed at a meeting in the Silverton Hotel in 1885. But today it is most recognizable as the place where Mad Max was filmed.

I had one unbearably hot night staying at Silverton as I wanted to take photos of the sunset over the Mundi Mundi Plains. I booked into the camping ground and then drove out to capture this spectacular sight only to give up before sundown as it was just too hot to hang around waiting.

Located about five kilometres West of Silverton, the Mundi Mundi Plains is a truly breathtaking place.
Looking out onto the expansive Mundi Mundi Plains, it’s a perfect spot to take in a sunset or picnic.
The view must be seen to be believed. The wide, flat heart of the Australian outback extends seemingly forever. On a clear day the curvature of the earth can be seen.
Of course, a lot of people have seen the area yet may not realise it, spotlighted as it was in the famous crash scene of Mad Max 2. Sharp-eyed explorers can even find old sets from the movie smattered around.

from: http://www.silverton.org.au/sights.htm

A few kms further on I visited the Umberumberka Reservoir – well, it used to be a water catchment but it was bone dry when I was there!

Hot and dry! If you wanted to define Australia’s outback with photos from one area, these taken around Broken Hill would do it!

If you decide to visit Broken Hill choose a better time of the year than I did, when the weather is kinder and more of the tourist attractions are open. I did visit the Pro Hart Gallery and also the Royal Flying Doctor Service but truly, it was just too hot and uncomfortable to enjoy the sights on offer.

Before leaving Broken Hill I also had the chance to catch up with my cousin’s daughter, Jodie, who recently married and moved to this area, so my journey here was most worthwhile from a family point of view – and I’m looking forward to going back in cooler weather to see and do all the things I missed this time around – and to catch up with the rellies once again!

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3 thoughts on “Broken Hill and Beyond

  1. Broken Hill is an absolute must do isn’t it?

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  2. I loved it for the chance to catch up with family but really need to go back when the weather is kinder. Just too hot to enjoy and so many things closed as I was out of season. And there’s so much to see nearby that I’d like to do. You know, when you travel like this, the more you see the more you realise there is to see 😄 It really is a never ending journey

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  3. We loved Silverton that was great and visiting the Dream Mine too. Plus of course seeing the museums and Mad Max car.

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